Category Archives: Tropical Fruit Plants

The Canary Islands are a paradise for exotic fruits and we offer the largest selection in Europe of tropical fruit trees

A Rainbow of Bananas

IMG-20181212-WA0008 Canarius | Thursday December 6th, 2018 |

We took this picture in June 2018 in order to show the incredible diversity of bananas that we pick in our nursery. We grow more than 80 different cultvars, with different tastes, shapes and colours, with the aim of producting quality suckers for our webshop.

The bananas that we put on our wooden  bench for this pircture belong to the following cultivars, clockwise: Cavendish, Dwarf Red (Figue Rose), Blue Java, Rajapuri and Monkey Fingers.

Cavendish is the most widespread yellow banana of the world trade. Dwarf Red , or Figue Rose, is the most common red-skinned banana. Blue Java, Rajapuri and Monkey Fingers are non-commercial bananas, only grown on a small scale or in family backyards for their great taste.

When we post for the frist time this photo, in our facebook page we reached in a few days 12k people. An astonishing record.

You can check the original photo in our facebook page .

We sell the plants of all these bananas through our website www.canarius.com. If you want to go straight to our BANANA SECTION click the link.

Three bananas grown in Tenerife: Dwarf Curare Plantain, Dwarf Red and Manzano.

Three bananas grown in Tenerife: Dwarf Curare Plantain, Dwarf Red and Manzano.

The exotic red Atemoya

Anonna x Atemoya Red Israel texture Canarius | Thursday February 2nd, 2017 |

This superior quality, hybrid Atemoya surprises us by its intense red color, resistance, and exquisite flavor.

Atemoya: The best of the Anona and the Cherimoya

Anonna x Atemoya Red Israel 1The Annona x atemoya, also known as atemoya, is a hybrid between the Annona squamosa and the Annona cherimola (Cherimoya). In fact, the name of this exotic hybrid comes from combining “ate”—the old Mexican name for sugar-apple— and “moya”—from cherimoya—.

Both the Annona squamosa (anona, sugar-apple) and the Annona cherimola (Cherimoya) are subtropical crops originating in Central and South America, which generate large fruit with pulp sprinkled with large seeds.

The atemoya inherits the characteristics of the annona and the cherimoya, presenting an extremely adaptable and robust plant.

The red hybrid Atemoya from Israel

This particular hybrid comes from Israel and has a striking red skin. Although this crossing could remind us to the “big red” Annona squamosa; The “red Israel” is not an A. squamosa, but an atemoya, that is, that has a part of cherimoya as well.

Texture and color

The atemoyas usually have a heart or oval shape and are pale green. However this hybrid has a more rounded shape and its skin is a spectacular reddish color, as its name suggests.

Anonna x Atemoya Red Israel 2Usually the atemoya has a very rough skin in the part of the stem, very similar to the Annona squamosa, with fleshy protuberances similar to scales. As we move toward the base, the texture softens and looks more like a cherimoya. In this case, the skin texture of the Red Israel Atemoya is slightly rougher and even reminiscent of that of an artichoke.

Undoubtedly, the most striking visual feature of this hybrid Atemoya is its attractive red color, which arouses the appetite by just looking at it.

Pulp and flavor

The atemoya does not have the pulp divided into sections as occurs in the A. squamosa, but it is homogeneous. In this sense, the atemoya looks more like a cherimoya. The pulp is white, although sometimes it may have a slight pinkish hue.

The flavor of this “Red Israel” hybrid is exquisite: it is quite sweet but with a slight acid touch. It has tastes of pineapple, vanilla and blueberry. Also, its texture is very soft, succulent, and watery.

In addition, besides its exquisite flavor, the atemoya has fewer seeds than the cherimoyas. They have a dark brown color and are not edible.

Cultivation of the “Red Israel” Atemoya

At Canarius, we offer a potted graft of about 30 to 60 centimeters within 4 to 18 months old. We graft Annona x Atemoya adult cuttings in Annona cherimolas to improve the cold resistance of its roots.

The result is a robust plant, which has a cold hardyness similar to an A. cherimola and adapts itself very well. It does not need manual pollination and is very productive: it usually ripens from 4 to 6 months after flowering.

Enjoy this striking and tasty hybrid of Atemoya and many more exotic fruits that you will only find in Canarius.

Tenerife, a dream place for exotic fruits in Europe

litchi-fruit-at-canarius Canarius | Tuesday December 13th, 2016 |

Scientists working at the Canary Islands Institute of Agricultural Research (ICIA), an autonomous body attached to the Minister for Agriculture, Stockbreeding, Fisheries, and Food in the Canary Islands Government, continue to analyze the enormous possibilities of growing exotic fruits in the Canary Islands to explore new marketing opportunities.

To this effect, researchers focus their analysis on the farm Cueva del Polvo (Guía de Isora, Tenerife) with a collection of recent exotic fruit species in the Archipelago, such as Mamey Colorado or Jackfruit.

Particular attention in this field should be made to the lychee trials, also known as litchi, carried out with different varieties and which have shown the interest of this fruit of appreciated taste qualities to the point that, in ancient times, it was reserved for the emperors.

online-mango-treeTo these studies are added those developed in Papaya, aimed at identifying the best varieties of this exotic fruit to determine the most outstanding aspects of each of them.

We also seek to clarify whether, in the future and using innovative breeding techniques, crossbreeding could be achieved with plants considered more optimal to obtain better-adapted varieties in the medium term.

Additional tasks have also been developed related to the mango fruit aimed, among other aspects, to analyze the evaluation of plantations and the development of new cultivation techniques.

All these investigations allow to diversify the agricultural activity and that the farmers have a greater variety of the crop as a complement to the traditional ones; As well as obtaining better commercial-quality fruits.

The exotic plants we have at Canarius are grown within greenhouses in different areas of Tenerife, where the use of chemicals is kept to a minimum. Some of our nurseries are completely organic, and others are energetically self-sufficient.

In the Canary Islands, we enjoy a subtropical climate with a cool winter. However, our nurseries are not air-conditioned to produce robust and resistant plants that can be grown in colder climates.

Wrapping Banana Tree in an Exotic Garden

wrapping-the-bananas Canarius | Monday October 17th, 2016 |

banana-or-plantain-treeThe banana or plantain tree requires warm weather and constant humidity in the air. They need an average temperature of 26-27 °C, with prolonged and regularly distributed rains.

For the cultivation of banana trees is preferable humid plains near the sea, sheltered from the winds and irrigable zones. Also, their growth stops at temperatures below 18 °C, resulting in damage to the trees at temperatures below 13 °C and higher than 45 °C.

That is why our archipelago in the Canary Islands has become the ideal place to cultivate this tropical fruit species. In this location, the Canarius plants are being grown for the past years.

In tropical conditions, the natural light does not have much effect on the development of the plant as in subtropical conditions. Although by decreasing the intensity of light, the growth cycle is lengthened. Even the development of the offsets is also influenced by the light quantity and intensity.

The lack of water at any time can cause the reduction of the banana trees in number and size of their fruit, and in the final return of the crop itself.

Wind effects can vary: from causing an abnormal perspiration due to the reopening of the stomata to the laceration of the leaf blade, (most widespread damage) producing losses in the final return of up to 20%. Also, high winds break the petioles of the leaves and the pseudostems, which could result in the rooting out of the whole plant.

A gardener wrapping his banana tree

At Canarius, thanks to our experience in tropical plants, we suggest that, during the winter months and under the threat of frost, it is essential to take precautions for the crop’s protection.

The most common mechanism to do this is to use some coating, such as sheets, blankets, or tarps to protect them from the cold, expressly designed for gardens during the winter.
Below we shared the time-lapse of a gardener wrapping his banana tree ready for winter in his garden in England:

Timelapse: Wrapping the bananas in the Exotic Garden from Chris Ridley on Vimeo.

Ficus carica and its rich fruit: the fig

Ficus-carica Canarius | Monday August 22nd, 2016 |

Ficus carica, also popularly known as fig tree, is a small tree or shrub (about 5 metres high) belonging to the family of Moraceae (Moraceae). Ficus carica is one of the variants of the Ficus genus, whose original cultivation occurs in western Asia. However, it now grows spontaneously in some regions of the Mediterranean and other parts of the world.

The shrub has a smooth, greyish bark and is heavily branched. Its leaves are deciduous, green and consist of 3 to 5 lobes.

Common fig (or just the fig)

Figs-(Ficus-carica)

It also produces a fruit known as figs: medium fruit the size of a light bulb or a little smaller. Some figs have a clear green colour and others are black or purplish.

Figs have a rather sweet taste and are noted for their high fibre content, higher than many fruits. They also provide a considerable amount of minerals and vitamins such as iron and magnesium.

The fig (Ficus carica) usually grows in rocky terrain, and even walls, from sea level to 1700 metres high. Its roots are quite vigorous and can sometimes move the ground under which they grow.

They are shrubs very resistant to adverse conditions and are grown primarily as second-class fruit trees. Some fig trees, called breveras, produce two crops a year: brebas in June (older than figs) and figs, between late August and early September.

As well as seasonal fresh fruit, figs have traditionally been consumed after undergoing the drying process, this has been the most common way to preserve the fruit.

“Dry” or “overripe” fruit, especially figs, was a food that was especially valued. The process allowed to delay their consumption and covered times when food shortage was notorious. Their leaves have been used for animal feed.