Tag Archives: Tropical Fruit Trees

A Rainbow of Bananas

IMG-20181212-WA0008 Canarius | Thursday December 6th, 2018 |

We took this picture in June 2018 in order to show the incredible diversity of bananas that we pick in our nursery. We grow more than 80 different cultvars, with different tastes, shapes and colours, with the aim of producting quality suckers for our webshop.

The bananas that we put on our wooden  bench for this pircture belong to the following cultivars, clockwise: Cavendish, Dwarf Red (Figue Rose), Blue Java, Rajapuri and Monkey Fingers.

Cavendish is the most widespread yellow banana of the world trade. Dwarf Red , or Figue Rose, is the most common red-skinned banana. Blue Java, Rajapuri and Monkey Fingers are non-commercial bananas, only grown on a small scale or in family backyards for their great taste.

When we post for the frist time this photo, in our facebook page we reached in a few days 12k people. An astonishing record.

You can check the original photo in our facebook page .

We sell the plants of all these bananas through our website www.canarius.com. If you want to go straight to our BANANA SECTION click the link.

Three bananas grown in Tenerife: Dwarf Curare Plantain, Dwarf Red and Manzano.

Three bananas grown in Tenerife: Dwarf Curare Plantain, Dwarf Red and Manzano.

Wrapping Banana Tree in an Exotic Garden

wrapping-the-bananas Canarius | Monday October 17th, 2016 |

banana-or-plantain-treeThe banana or plantain tree requires warm weather and constant humidity in the air. They need an average temperature of 26-27 °C, with prolonged and regularly distributed rains.

For the cultivation of banana trees is preferable humid plains near the sea, sheltered from the winds and irrigable zones. Also, their growth stops at temperatures below 18 °C, resulting in damage to the trees at temperatures below 13 °C and higher than 45 °C.

That is why our archipelago in the Canary Islands has become the ideal place to cultivate this tropical fruit species. In this location, the Canarius plants are being grown for the past years.

In tropical conditions, the natural light does not have much effect on the development of the plant as in subtropical conditions. Although by decreasing the intensity of light, the growth cycle is lengthened. Even the development of the offsets is also influenced by the light quantity and intensity.

The lack of water at any time can cause the reduction of the banana trees in number and size of their fruit, and in the final return of the crop itself.

Wind effects can vary: from causing an abnormal perspiration due to the reopening of the stomata to the laceration of the leaf blade, (most widespread damage) producing losses in the final return of up to 20%. Also, high winds break the petioles of the leaves and the pseudostems, which could result in the rooting out of the whole plant.

A gardener wrapping his banana tree

At Canarius, thanks to our experience in tropical plants, we suggest that, during the winter months and under the threat of frost, it is essential to take precautions for the crop’s protection.

The most common mechanism to do this is to use some coating, such as sheets, blankets, or tarps to protect them from the cold, expressly designed for gardens during the winter.
Below we shared the time-lapse of a gardener wrapping his banana tree ready for winter in his garden in England:

Timelapse: Wrapping the bananas in the Exotic Garden from Chris Ridley on Vimeo.

The cold-hardy Gomera-1 Mango Tree

Canarius | Sunday May 29th, 2011 |

Gomera-1 is a hardy variety of Mango suited to a coastal Mediterranean climate. It is used as a rootstock for grafting other cultivars of mango, because the roots of Gomera-1 grow better in colder or dryer areas and improve the cold-hardiness of the plant.

Two Mango Gomera-1 trees in a poorly irrigated terrace in Southern Anaga, Tenerife.

This variety of mango is well adapted to the environment of the Canary Islands. It can be seen thriving in windy areas with rocky soils. It is unscathed by cool and wet winters and fruits very well and regularly. It is found on many islands and it was probably, initially brought from Cuba. The name Gomera refers to the island of La Gomera, one of the seven islands of our archipelago. This is where Canarian agronomists collected the first samples to study this mango which is quite common in the rural areas of the islands.  Fruits are yellow, small to average size (250 g average), with  very good flavour, sweet, aromatic, with a high content in fibres.

Yellow fruits of the Cold Hardy Canarian Mango named Gomera – 1

Cultivation

It needs just the same conditions of any other mango trees. It is reproduced from seed. As a polyembrionic Mango, 90% of the seedlings are true to type. Adult trees are able to flower up to 3 times a year. If it is too cold or wet, they will loose the inflorescences and flower again, about 2 months later, until the right season for fruit set is matched. In order to achieve larger fruits sizes, it is good to remove by hand 1/3 of the fruits from the bunch. Gomera-1 fruits outdoors in coastal Mediterranean climates and it needs little or no protection in coastal Portugal, Spain, Italy and Greece and also in the French Riviera.

Use as Root Stock for Grafting

Mango Gomera is regularly used as a rootstock for grafting throughout the Canary Islands and also in Andalusia. The use of the Canarian Hardy Mango as a rootstock permitted to push the commercial production of Mango in the Mediterranean basin, because the roots are hardier to cold and wet soil. All the different varieties of mango trees that we offer for sale are grafted on Gomera-1 rootstocks, so our customers in Europe will get the benefit of some added cold resistance from the roots.

Gomera mango trees used as a rootstock to graft different varieties

Gomera mango trees used as a rootstock to graft different varieties

Scientific Literature in Spanish about Mango Gomera

Mejora del Mango en Canarias

Gomera-1 en el programa de mejora del Mango

Buy cold hardy mango trees in our Shop

In our shop you can purchase small trees of Gomera mangos and also a wide selection of mango trees of different varieties. All trees are grafted by hand, with specific cultivars. We ship them directly to your home. Try also our delicious Mango jam with or without sugar, in the honeys & jams section, produced with the mangoes of the Canary Islands.

Growing Acerola Fruits in Cold Climates

Canarius | Tuesday November 30th, 2010 |

Acerola is a cherry like fruit native to tropical America. The fruit is extremely high in vitamine C. It grows from a small tree  which is also ornamental. The scientific name is Malpighia glabra. It is usually grown in tropical and subtropical countries but it can be tried further North.

Can Malpighia glabra grow out of the tropics?

  • Acerola is hardy to-2 C (28 F). It grows and fruits outdoors in coastal Mediterranean climates. Malpighia glabra needs no protection in warmer Southern Portugal, Spain, Italy and Greece and also in the French Riviera.

    Fruit of Acerola

    Fruit of Acerola

  • Malpighia glabra has a fast fruiting cycle. It goes from flower to fruit in just 3-4 weeks.  Acerola does not need a long summer. One or two crops of acerolas can be expected in northern latitudes.

    Flower of Malpighia glabra

    Flower of Malpighia glabra

  • Malpighia glabra grows well in pots. It can be kept as a small shrub and it will still fruit freely.  In colder areas, potted plants can be moved to a warmer site in winter, and can be placed in full sun during the warmer months.

    These are the plants of Acerola that we sell at www.canarius.com

    These are the plants of Acerola that we sell at www.canarius.com

  • Acerola stands drought and can do a winter rest. Potted shrubs can be kept on the dry side during the winter months. It will drop some leaves and will come back with leaves and new flowers when warmth and water are provided.

The Mamey Sapote – Mamey Rojo or Red Mamey

Canarius | Thursday September 2nd, 2010 |

The Mamey Rojo – Mamey Colorado or Red Mamey. Information from the Canary Islands and a video with The Tropical Fruit Growers of South Florida.

We are proud to offer grafted plants of Mamey Colorado, a fabulous tropical fruit tree, which is hard to find in Europe. We sell the improved variety “Pantin” and we ship our grafted trees to anywhere in Europe.

Pouteria sapota Pantin – Mamey Colorado

This is a video published by the “Tropical Fruit Growers”, presenting the famous tropical fruit called – Mamey Sapote or Mamey Colorado - with Mr. Julian Lara.

Red Mamey is a tropical evergreen tree native to Central America commonly grown as an ornamental.

The tree has an open crown with a central thick trunk and some large branches. It could reach up to 20 m (60 ft) in tropical regions. Leaves are 30 cm (12 “) long and 10 cm (4 “) wide, the shape is obovate or oblolanceolate and they are group and the end of small branches. Flowers are small, whitish and sessile. The fruit is a berry, oval-shaped, with a persistent calyx; its size varies from 8-20 cm (3-8 “) length. The skin is thick and reddish, similar to very soft sandpaper. The flesh of ripen fruits is salmon-pink, orange or red and the texture varies from smooth, firm to finely granulate. It has a sweet unique taste similar to almonds. Usually there is a long, elliptic seed, but could be four. Fruits weight 0,3-2,7 kg (0,7-6 lb). Available in the summer. Could be eaten fresh and used in milk shakes, soups, preserves and deserts. The grafted variety “Pantin” is most spread in Florida and from all the varieties of red the mamey this has the best taste.

Canarius offers grafted mameys. Grafting trees is an art and it is very difficult to graft Pouteria as it takes many months and many failures to achieve the goal.

This fruit tree in Spanish is called:

  • Mamey Sapote
  • Sapote Rojo
  • Mamey Rojo
  • Mamey Cubano

Mango Varieties sold by Canarius for Mediterranean and Subtropical Climates

Canarius | Wednesday May 5th, 2010 |

The mango tree, Mangifera indica, is an evergreen tropical tree tolerant of cooler conditions and short droughts. There are literally thousands of different types, called varieties or cultivars.

Canarius offers a selection of varieties better adapted to non tropical climates, grafted on a the hardy rootstock “Gomera-1″. You can buy young trees in the shop. Mango will effortlessly grow and fruit outdoors in warm Mediterranean Climates, such as coastal areas of Portugal, Spain, Italy and Greece. Adult plants resist short freezes at -4°C (25°F), but young trees are more sensitive. Mango is the third most important tropical crop in the Canary Islands, after banana and avocado.  

This is Mango Irwin, grown in Tenerife

Different varieties hide different flavours, fruit sizes and colours. Mangos may be dark green, greenish-yellow, yellow, red, orange or purple. By planting different varieties, the fruiting season can be extended up to four months. Low-growing varieties, such as ” Keitt ” can grow and fruit in large pots. The yellow Canarian mango “Gomera” is the most resistant to cold and frost and it fruits even in South France. “Lippens” fruits well in cooler conditions, so it is planted at higher elevations in the Canaries. “Osteen” is grown commercially in Mediterranean Southern Spain.

Grafting is the best way to reproduce the best varieties. The mangos sold at Canarius are all grafted and the rootstock is the hardy canarian mango “Gomera-1″, because it is resistant to drought and wet, cool soil in winter. Our mango trees are hardier to cold because we use this type of rootstock.

Fruits of Mango Gomera-3. Gomera is a hardy Canarian variety used as a rootstock. Mango trees grafted with gomera are less sensitive to cold and drought.

Canarius offers the varieties that are planted here in the Canary Islands, in our subtropical-mediterranean climate. We ship to your home the same grafted trees that are sold to local farmers , ready to go to the field: same plants, same size, same deep pots.

The plants you purchase are at least 2 years old, because the root trees are grown for 1,5 years before grafting. Then they are grafted and grown for at least six  moremonths. These plants will fruit in two or three years. They will bloom very soon but you will need to remove the inflorescence during the first two years, to allow stronger vegetative growth before fruiting.

Grafting Mangos in the Nursery

In our shop you can purchase a wide selection of mango trees of different varieties. All trees are grafted by hand, with specific cultivars. We ship to any countries in Europe.

Try also our delicious Mango jam with or without sugar, in the honeys & jams section, produced with the mangoes of the Canary Islands.

List of our stock of Mangifera indica
(Not all varieties are available at any time. Sometimes we only supply a few mango cultivars.)

  • Anderson
  • Ataulfo
  • Bill
  • Edward
  • These are the mango plants that we ship to your homeFord
  • Gomera (Hardy Mango)
  • Haden
  • Heidi
  • Irwin
  • Isis
  • Kensington
  • Keitt
  • Lily
  • Lippens
  • Manzanillo
  • Mun
  • Osteen
  • Palmer
  • Sensation
  • Tolbert
  • Tommy Atkins
  • Valencia Pride
  • Van Dyke
  • Zill

Jardín Félix – A private home garden in the mountains of Tenerife

Canarius | Friday April 30th, 2010 |

This garden is named Jardín Félix was started on a plot of wasteland in Igueste, a village in the Anaga mountains in Tenerife. Created by Phil Inkelberghe in 2005-2006 and wonderfully maintained by Thierry Jacoby.

The video shows how the garden was started from abandoned land, invaded by wild Opuntia cactus. Stone walls and rockeries were built and now a beautiful garden flourishes. There are palmssucculent plantstropical fruit trees, and native canarian species.

Some plant species shown in this video of this home garden in the Canary Islands:

  • Euphorbia
  • Yucca
  • Aeonium
  • Kleinia nerifolia
  • Phoenix canariensis (Canary Island
  • Aloe vera in bloom
  • Monadenium
  • Aloe ferox
  • Coccoloba uvifera (Seagrape)
  • Musa (Banana)
  • Mangifera (Mango)
  • Dracaena draco

Mediterranean Climate

Canarius | Tuesday January 5th, 2010 |

Mediterranean climate is characterized by hot, dry summers and cool, wet winters. This climate is found in the Mediterranean Basin, as well as in SW California, SW Australia, SW South Africa and Central Chile. All share the same rainfall pattern with a peak in the cooler season.

The Mediterranean Basin, between Southern Europe and Northern Africa is surely the best example of a typical mediterranean climate. There is a big termical difference between the North and the South. Northern latitudes are much cooler. Southern France is the Northernmost extension of the Mediterranean. It is not as hot as other areas but there is a very good climate, because of the protection of the Alps, that block the cold fronts from the North and keeps the cimate very Mediterranean. In the lower latitudes, on the Northern African coast, winters are much shorter and sunnier while frost is absent or very uncommon.

Exotic Gardens and Crops in Mediterranean Climates

Many subtropical species grow outdoors with minimal effort in coastal gardens of Mediterranean countries, in Southern Europe and Northern Africa. More than 50 palm species can take regular light frosts, exotic flowers such as Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia) and many Cycad species. Hundred of species of Cacti and Succulents can grow and bloom as long as they are kept dry in winter. Palm-like desert plants, such as Yucca and Dasylirion, thrive to perfection. Some tropical fruit trees can produce outdoors, such as avocado (Persea) and Feijoa sellowiana. Occasional frosts limit the spread of tropical horticulture in the Northern side of the Mediterranean Basin.

Aloe arborescens

Aloes from South Africa are used as garden plants in Mediterranean Climates

A warmer Mediterranean climate is found in the Southern Mediterranean, where winters are shorter and sunnier and frosts seldom occur. Some writers state these are Subtropical climates. Even some fully tropical species can grow in the better, warmer spots of Southern Spain and Portugal, the Balearic Islands, Sardinia and Sicily, the Greek Islands and the whole coast of Northern Africa have eccelent climates to grow exotics. Tropical fruits grow freely, as Mango, Annona and Avocado are produced commercially in various regions.

Persea Hass Cut

Avocado fruits regularly in many coastal areas

An impressive number of Palms and Cycads is kept by collectors. Many tropical flowers will winter outdoors. Bromeliads and Plumeria hybrids can be used freely as garden plants and Plumeria is the official flower of the city of Palermo, in Sicily. In lower latitudes, Cacti and Succulents are simply part of the landscape. Different species of Agave, mostly from Mexico, grow wild on the hillsides of Mediterranean Europe and Aloes flourish in pots and gardens. Large specimens will often enhance the garden of the villa, in the ground or in large pots. Southern Spain and Portugal are even sunnier, almost as Northern Africa so Cuban Royal Palms (Roystonea regia) and Royal Poincianas (Delonix regia) thrive in many coastal location, papayas will fruit with little effort.

Agave attenuata

Mexican Agaves thrive in Mediterranean Climates. These Agave attenuata are grown in Tenerife as ornamental plants.