Category Archives: News

News about gardening, exotic plants, strange plants…

The Practice of Lateral Grafting at Canarius

plant-grafting Canarius | Friday September 9th, 2016 |

When we talk about grafting in plant fields, we refer to the combination of two different species, joined so as to continue their growth together as a single plant. Grafting produces a ‘chimera’, i.e. a plant with two different genes: one in the roots and another in aerial parts.

Grafting is carried out by making cuts in the rootstock in order for it to receive the scion, so that the joining occurs between the two plants.

plant-fieldFor the joining to take place, it’s necessary that certain conditions are met: we call those that depend on the nature of the plant, ‘internal conditions’; and the inherent requirements of the environment where the new species is developed, ‘external conditions’.

Grafting between plants of the same variety or gender are almost certain to happen. However, when grafting between different species, there is a much lower percentage of probability.

The cuts made in both the rootstock and scion must be clean. Both parts should join intimately and remain linked with a tie, until the grafting is attached and set.

lateral-graftingTypes of Grafting

As for the types of grafting, they’re varied, some more advisable than others for certain plants or times of the year in which they’re carried out. With lateral grafting -one which is practised at Canarius farms- it’s carried out in late winter, when the bark can be peeled off the rootstock with ease.

With lateral grafting, a T-shaped cut is made in a smooth area of the rootstock’s bark and then peeled. Additionally, the cutting below the raised bark is introduced.

After the bud has sprouted from the cutting, the top part of the rootstock is cut off so that all the sap goes to the graft and grows strong. After approximately 15 days, the raffia tie is removed so not to strangle the graft.

This type of graft is valid for all trees and shrubs, both deciduous and perennials. At Canarius we also carry out other practices of grafting which we’ll explain in later posts.

Mango Cultivation in the Canary Islands

Mangifera-cv-Gomera-1 Canarius | Wednesday June 1st, 2016 |
mango-trees-orchard

Image ICIA (Instituto Canario de Investigaciones Agraria)

The Mango fruit was introduced in the Canary Islands at the end of 18th century, originating from the Philippines. Although throughout 19th century came to the archipelago numerous Cuban and Venezuelan mangos. In a short period of time, this fruit is become in a common tree in gardens located in the coastline of the Canary Islands, where climate noticeably favors its development.

The best areas for mango cultivation in the archipelago are warm sites of coastlines in the South. Despite the tree is very rustic and it can grow in any sort of soil, due to the subtropical climate in the Canary Islands, mango (Mangifera) prefers those soils with a great depth (minimum 80 cm).

Mango blooming is presented in the Canary Islands in February or March, as a direct consequence of cold in winter. The minimum temperatures in those dates are relatively low and, therefore, there are some problems for bearing fruit.

The most important variety of mango tree for our archipelago it is the local Gomera 1.

Description of the Mango Gomera

hardy-canarian-mangoMango Gomera is a very robust medium sized tree, with dome shaped crown, and stiff, thick, arching leaves. Flushes of new leaves are deep red-burgundy. It is able to flower up to 3 times a year. If it is too cold or wet, it will lose the inflorescences and flower again, about 2 months later, until the right season for fruit set is matched.

Fruits are yellow with pale dots and sometimes with a hint of pink. They are produced in groups, with a small to average size (250 g average), very good flavor, aromatic, with a high content in fibers.

Genetic analysis shows thant it is very closely related (not the same) to the Cuban Mango “Filipino”, and to the Floridan Mango “Turpentine”. It is possibly the same of the Cuban “Manga Blanca”.

Scientific Literature in Spanish about Mango Gomera

“Mejora del Mango en Canarias”, Instituto Canario de Investigaciones Agrarias (ICIA)

“Gomera-1 en el programa de mejora del Mango”,  Instituto Canario de Investigaciones Agrarias (ICIA)

Buy cold hardy mango trees in our Shop

In our shop, Canarius, you can purchase small trees of Gomera mangos and also a wide selection of mango trees of different varieties. All trees are grafted by hand, with specific cultivars. We ship to any countries in Europe. Try also our delicious Mango jam with or without sugar, in the honeys & jams section, produced with the mangoes of the Canary Islands.

Adenium socotranum is grown in rocky slopes

The-Socotra-Desert Canarius | Friday February 12th, 2016 |

Adenium socotranum is an endemic species from the rocky slopes of the island of Socotra in the Indian Ocean (South of the Arabian peninsula and east of the Horn of Africa). Place where the authorities are very protective of the natural resources.

adenium-socotranum-canarius

Socotra is considered the jewel of biodiversity in the Arabian Sea. In the 1990s, a team of United Nations biologists conducted a survey of the archipelago’s flora and fauna. They counted nearly 700 endemic species, found nowhere else on earth; only Hawaii, New Caledonia, and the Galápagos Islands have more impressive numbers.

Socotranum is one the most admired species in the genus Adenium. It attains a huge size, of two, three or more meters in height. Showy clusters of pink flowers are regularly produced in Adult plants. The pink flower of the plant appears for a couple of weeks in spring. Moreover, the species is similar to a miniature baobab.

As we have said before, Adenium socotranum grows among stones in grit or on other well drained soil. The species shows several morphological and physiological adaptations to cope with the dry climate and strong winds.

This magnificent species is virtually unknown in cultivation, so its performance cannot be described with confidence. Here it grows from may or june to december, so it will be resting leafless from january to may or so. At Canarius, we offer a1-2 year old plant, Container size 10 cm. Plants can be sent bare rooted.

Would you like to discover the marvelous atmosphere of Socotra in a Adenium socotranum? Have a look!

How to Root Sugarcane Cuttings

Canarius | Tuesday January 12th, 2016 |

Sugar-canes-in-Canarius

saccharum-officinarum-ceniza-bengala-striped-sugarcane

Sugar Cane is a 3-5 m tall tropical grass that produces most of the world sugar. Saccharum officinarum grows outdoors in tropical to warm mediterranean climates. Canes can be peeled and eaten at any moment, they are best after blooming. Sugar cane is very fast growing in hot summer weather, with abundant water and fertilize.

Cuttings are the best way to reproduce sugar cane, because they root easily and will give a plant exactly like the original mother plant. Reproduction from seed is much slower and it is only used experimentally in order to produce new cultivars.

The best rooting temperature is 20-30 C. Cuttings can be planted directly in soil or they can be rooted in water. New roots and new shoots will develop from the nodes: these are the dull-coloured rings present on each stem, formed as leaf-scars when old leaves fall off. Usually roots come first and then the buds wake up and form new primary shoots.

  • In soil: use a fluffy, sandy, draining soil. You can do it in two ways: stick the cuttings upright, burying 2/3 or them in the soil mix, or place the cuttings horizontally underground, lightly buried for a few millimeters. Keep them moist.
  • In water: put the cuttings upright in a tall glass filled with water. Roots will show up in one or two weeks. Move the rooting cuttings to soil after about one month from the start of the process.

how-to-root-sugarcane-cuttings

Cuttings can be rooted in sun or shade. It does not matter, because during about one month the rooting plants will live at the expenses of the sugar stored in the stem. After this time, the rooted plants should be moved to full sun as soon as possible, so the canes will start to grow thick thanks to their own photosynthesis.

Buy sugarganes from the Canary Islands

Saccharum_Caña_de_AzucarCome and visit our shop, www.canarius.com, and you will find different cultivars of traditional sugarcanes from the Caribbean, Polynesia and the Canary Islands. We ship to our customers packs of two super-thick cuttings ready to root and sprout.

Cordyline fruticosa ‘Lyon’s Black’, the boldest cultivar

Canarius | Wednesday December 30th, 2015 |

CORDYLINE-FRUTICOSA-CV

The genus Cordyline, belongs to the botanical family Asparagaceae, and it is native to Polynesia, New Zealand, Australia and S.E. Asia; also one species comes from South America.

In this case, we talk about the uncommon Cordyline fruticosa ‘Lyon’s Black’. This dark-leaved selection bears large sized, almost black leaves, with blueish wax. The whole plant is very erect and robust, 2 to 4,5 m tall. ‘Lyon’ s Black’ is one of the boldest cultivars. It was selected at Lyon Arboretum, in Honolulu, Hawaii. It typically blooms in Winter, with attractive sprays of pink-mauve flowers.

Its extremely dark foliage is a must in tropical gardens because it creates an incredible contrast with green backgrounds. The best colour is achieved in full sun.

As most large-sized Hawaiian cordylines, ‘Lyon’ s Black’ grows thick roots underground and is more resistant to wind, drought and cold than the smallest cultivars often sold in garden centres for indoor decoration. If its height is too much, it can be chopped in Spring at the desired height and it will soon sprout back from the cut stems.

About the exotic Cordylines

cordyline-fruticosa

Cordyline fruticosa is a marvelous foliage plant originating in the Pacific Islands. It adaptable to bright shade can grow indoors as a house plant. The wild type has green glossy leaves that are used throughout Polynesia to make food-wraps or the famous hula skirts. Many colourful cultivars have been selected for ornamental purposes.

Our Hawaiian selections will also be perfect in the tropical or subtropical garden. They can take cool temperatures but will be damaged or killed by frost. These “outdoor cultivars” bear leathery leaves and grow thick tuberous roots underground. They can even stand the cold winters of the coastal Mediterranean, especially if sheltered from the wind.

If you grow plants in full sun, you will obtain larger, robust specimens with thicker leaves. These plants will be much hardier to drought, wind and cold than plants grown in the shade.

After a few years, pot-grown Cordylines can start to become tall and leggy. If so, they can be kept low by pruning or air layering the shoots that become too tall. They will sprout new shoots from the base or from the cut.

The plant that we offer at Canarius is 20-40 cm tall and it is about 1 year old from cutting. It is grown in a pot of about 12-14 cm. Would you like to try a Cordyline fruticosa “Lyon’s Black”? Get it right now from us!