Tag Archives: plants

The Practice of Lateral Grafting at Canarius

plant-grafting Canarius | Friday September 9th, 2016 |

When we talk about grafting in plant fields, we refer to the combination of two different species, joined so as to continue their growth together as a single plant. Grafting produces a ‘chimera’, i.e. a plant with two different genes: one in the roots and another in aerial parts.

Grafting is carried out by making cuts in the rootstock in order for it to receive the scion, so that the joining occurs between the two plants.

plant-fieldFor the joining to take place, it’s necessary that certain conditions are met: we call those that depend on the nature of the plant, ‘internal conditions’; and the inherent requirements of the environment where the new species is developed, ‘external conditions’.

Grafting between plants of the same variety or gender are almost certain to happen. However, when grafting between different species, there is a much lower percentage of probability.

The cuts made in both the rootstock and scion must be clean. Both parts should join intimately and remain linked with a tie, until the grafting is attached and set.

lateral-graftingTypes of Grafting

As for the types of grafting, they’re varied, some more advisable than others for certain plants or times of the year in which they’re carried out. With lateral grafting -one which is practised at Canarius farms- it’s carried out in late winter, when the bark can be peeled off the rootstock with ease.

With lateral grafting, a T-shaped cut is made in a smooth area of the rootstock’s bark and then peeled. Additionally, the cutting below the raised bark is introduced.

After the bud has sprouted from the cutting, the top part of the rootstock is cut off so that all the sap goes to the graft and grows strong. After approximately 15 days, the raffia tie is removed so not to strangle the graft.

This type of graft is valid for all trees and shrubs, both deciduous and perennials. At Canarius we also carry out other practices of grafting which we’ll explain in later posts.

How to grow Cycads? Maurice Levin tell us:

Cycads-Canarius Canarius | Thursday May 19th, 2016 |

cycas-tanqingii-specimenCycads (division Cycadophyta) are unique plants from remote and primitive ages. They’re a species with similar forms to palms and ferns, despite not being related to each other. They’re also gymnosperms, in the Cycadales order, so do not produce flowers but do produce cones, such as pines and other conifers.

Cycads live in tropical and subtropical environments: humid rainforests, dry rainforests, cloud forests, pine-oak forests and shrubland. They’re often in danger and restricted to innaccessible or hard to reach areas. However, others grow in mountainous areas with cold temperatures, even tolerating frost and snow.

dioon-edule-specimenMost Cycad species grow well in the garden and they’re excellent potted plants. Some have become popular decorative plants, while others are very rare and are protected by law, such as CITES species (an international treaty against over-exploitation due to international trade).

Cycads are easy to grow because they do not require particular treatment. Watering frequency depends on the temperature and exposure of the plant: the soil of a plant that’s exposed to the sun will dry very quickly, so it should be watered more often. Although we must also be careful with waterlogging plantpots as it’s not a species that’s very tolerant of this.

Of course. Farmers should be very patient, since they’re slow-growing plants. As a revealing fact, we can highlight that Cycads can live for more than 2,000 years.

Maurice Levin, Cycad Expert

Below, we share a video in which planter and preservationist, Maurice Levin (founder of Jurassic Garden — A&A Cycads, a family-owned rare plant nursery in California), explains what Cycads are and their most optimum growing methods:

At Canarius our Cycads are plants grown from seeds, two or more years old, and grown in tall planters. All plants are grown legally.

We offer the largest selection of Cycads genus in Europe, with many new Chinese species resistant to cold. Visit the Cycad section on our blog and find out why our plants are of excellent quality.

Plumeria ‘Japanese Lantern’

Canarius | Tuesday December 1st, 2015 |

japanese-lantern1

Plumerias are small tropical trees native to tropical America, renowned for their flowers. Their common name, Frangipani, comes from a famous perfume of the eighteenth-century. Depending on the cultivar, they can grow up to 3 to 10 m tall. Moreover, plumerias are easy to grow, regardless of the region where you live.

plumerias-canariusWild species of Plumeria are native to warm tropical areas of the Caribbean, Central America and N. South America. These are very diverse in growth habit and their flowers are always white-and-yellow. They are all deciduous and shed leaves during the cool, dry season.

On the other hand, cultivated hybrids of Plumeria rubra are found throughout the world, in warm mediterranean to tropical areas. They are recognized by the showy and very fragrant flowers called Frangipani, developed in a wide range of colours: white, yellow, pink, red, orange…

Plumeria flowers have thick, waxy petals, with a predominance of two colours (depending on the hybrid), varying from the center to the edge of the petal, as we can see in this Plumeria ‘Japanese Lantern’:

 

japanese-lanternPlumeria “Japanese Lantern”

It is an old, classic, great cultivar of Plumeria, with drooping flower heads. Individual flowers have narrow petals, twisted at the tip. They are pink-red, with a small, brilliant yellow center.

‘Japanese Lantern’ is one of the few plumerias that blooms almost continuously throughout the warmest months – In the Canary Islands it can flower from April to December: 8 or 9 months per year instead of the typical 4-6 months of most cultivars. Some inflorescences can also survive to winter and start producing new flowers in early Spring.

The plant is very easy to grow and bloom. It is quite upright and thin at first but very robust eventually, becoming a long lived tree. It is perfect for landscaping where dense summer shade is required.

We ship a well rooted plant, 40-80 cm tall, sometimes branched, sometimes not. Usually an adult tip-cutting that can bloom in one year or less. Plumerias are leafless in winter and spring, so depending on the season, they can be shipped with pots or bare rooted in paper or sphagnum.

In our online store, Canarius, we have an ever-increasing offer of plumerias: Bali Whirl, Palermitana, Kauka Wilder, Sally Moragne… What is your favourite one?

Keep up to date with our website. We’ve got new plants!

Canarius | Friday August 7th, 2015 |

New-succulent-plants-on-Canarius We have recently uploaded more new plants on our website and some species are truly extraordinary! There are lots of new heliconias, aloes, hoyas, palms, and bananas. We are just starting with succulents and many more will come in the following weeks. Right after, we will explain some of these new species: – Amorphophallus titanum, the Titan Arum, produces the largest of all “flowers”. It is an incredible monster that is seldom seen in cultivation only the best botanical gardens keep one in their greenhouses and few lucky collectors. – Mangifera casturi, the Kasturi mango. This is a different, rare mango species, considered sacred in Borneo. It has the flavour of all flavours. It is grafted on Mango Gomera-1 to increase cold resistance. A true release! – Aspidistra cv. Asa Ahi. It is one of the most sought-after variegated perennials from Japan. The new leaves take almost two years to get the snow-white top that drives everybody crazy. It is frost-hardy and it can live indoors as a house plant. -  Hechtia tillandsioides: A cold-hardy terrestrial bromeliad with spineless soft silvery leaves. Seldom seen for sale, it will also bless your garden with huge “sprays” of pink flowers. – Rhapis excelsa VARIEGATED CULTIVARS. It took a lot of years to make the mother plants grow, but the first plants are now ready for sale! We offer different named clones of these uncommon variegated plants. They are also perfect as indoor plants for your home!

Remember that we are lucky due to any delivery from the Canary Islands travels as airmail, so the box often travels during just 3-8 days and skips any spell of cold or heat. Contact us if you have any question. Would you like to buy any sort of these plants? You just have to go into our online store y choose your favourite one. Go ahead!

Did you know the medicinal uses of Alpinia nutans?

Canarius | Thursday June 11th, 2015 |

false-cardamon-alpinia-nutans The truth is that from Canarius, we love plants due to a great variety of reasons. Although one of the most important of them is their use, as medicine. In this case, we are going to talk about a species that is used medicinally: Alpinia nutans. The wrong called Amomum cardamomun or Cardamon, whose origin is Southeast Asian, belongs to Ginger family. Alpinia nutans is a cool-growing species of Alpinia which has several medicinal uses: to control hypertension, as a diuretic, antifungal or antiulcer. In countries such as Japan, this plant is used as food preservative. Alpinia nutans also helps to relieve headache or flu. Likewise, in some places (Brazil), its essential oil is used to control hypertension or heart diseases. Moreover, the plant is considered as an important stomach protector too.

alpinia-nutans-(1) Concerning its characteristics, Alpinia nutans is possibly the frost-hardiest in the genus. It is similar to Alpinia zerumbet, but shorter in stature with wavier leaf margins. Flowers are equally beautiful! It usually takes a few years before flowering and then it does it regularly. Our rhizomes are uprooted from adult, blooming, mother plants. Anyway, on Canarius we count on a great number of flowering plants in the family Zingiberaceae, the well-known Ginger family: Alpinia purpurata or Alpinia zerumbet Variegata, among others. Take a look on our plants online store and buy whatever you need (or you want). We sell strong, field-grown, rhizomes with at least two “eyes” (active growing points). Some will have roots or leaves, some will not. There will be some variation according to the time of the year, because growth is seasonal. Rhizomes are individually wrapped in moist perlite or sphagnum. Turn into a healthy person and buy your Alpinia nutans right now. You can discover a world without pills and full of natural feelings. However, you must be fast, because you’ve already got the last one…