Tag Archives: aechmea

Aechmea blumenavii in the Garden

aechmea-blumenavii-canarius Canarius | Wednesday September 28th, 2016 |

buy-online-aechmea-blumenaviiBeautiful Aechmea from the outskirts of a city named Blumenau, in the cool, wet South East of Brazil. Aechmea blumenavii is a rare, cold hardy bromeliad. It is endemic to Sierra de Santa Catarina, by the city of Blumenau in SE Brazil.

Aechmea blumenavii is an endangered species and it is classified as Rare by the IUCN. This is the TRUE blumenavii, not the many mislabelled specimens in the trade. That’s why it is a rare endangered species in habitat. It is a tropical looking species which is highly sought after for gardening in non tropical countries because it is able to stand freezes to about -8 C.

 

flower-aechmea-blumenaviiAechmea blumenavii in the Garden

Aechmea blumenavii is very easy to grow in cultivation. Leaves are green and show the typical blue tip. Spikes of yellow flowers are produced in the cooler months, followed by pink-red fruits. Fruits will stay colourful for months.

As time passes it grows as a mat-forming ground cover.  As a bromeliad, it will need a draining substrate, with sand, compost or similar. It will enjoy growing on a raised bed or a rockery. It can also be grown on trees or rocks.

It grows as a house plant because it takes shade and dry air, so growers can take it indoors in the winter months to enjoy the flowers.

Our Shop

Please visit the Bromeliad Section of our Shop and check back often, because we offerent different bromeliads at different times of the year. We ship bromeliads to anywhere in Europe. Our bromeliads are already growing in many European countries, such as Spain, Ireland, Italy, Poland, and Germany.

All bromeliads in catalogue are sold as bare-rooted “pups”, which are the robust basal suckers produced after blooming. Our pups are very easy to root – some will already show some roots when you open the box.

Bromeliads according to their type of flower

Bromeliads Canarius | Monday June 13th, 2016 |

Bromeliaceae or Bromeliads are a family of monocot plants consisting of shrubs or perennial, terrestrial or epiphytic grasses.

Bromeliads have rosette leaves, flowers and colourful and showy bracts, as well as the typically twisted stigmas. A typology that differentiates, precisely, due to the type of flower that’s born and its particular shape. In this case we will talk about the Billbergia, Aechmea and Neoregelia genera.

Billbergia

Billbergia

The genus Billbergia, belongs to the large family of Bromeliads and particularly includes many epiphytic species, growing over any other plant without parasitising it. Although there are also some terrestrial species.

The Billbergia bromeliad is known for its intense green, elongated, strong leaves, bearing numerous very small thorns, placed along its margins.

The leaves are arranged forming a central cup, collecting rain water used by the plant as a water reserve and where flora and, often abundant, fauna will accumulate: plant and animal remains that are partly digested with decomposition.

The flowers are held on long rigid or twisted stems, protected by bracts of various colours depending on the species and variety, commonly attached in hanging clusters. Even without a long life they’re splendid.

Aechmea 

Aechmea

The genus Aechmea, also belongs to the Bromeliad family. However, this species has a reduced root system, absorbing the water needed for its development through the foliage.

The particularity of its leaves is arranged so that the water is channeled inside a central cup caused by widening of the leaves in which rainwater is collected in nature.

Spike inflorescence emerges from the central part of the cup, where there are numerous flowers surrounded diffusely by rigid coloured bracts (pink, yellow, red or orange) and long lasting.

Neoregelia

Neoregelia

In reference to the bromeliad family, we also find the so-called genus Neoregelia. It’s a species that doesn’t reach considerable size, as it doesn’t exceed 30-40 cm in height; the leaves can reach a width of 60 cm and a length of 40 cm.

The particularity of the Neoregelia is the rosette arrangement of the extending leaves in the central part forming a type of cup in which rainwater is collected in nature. A cavity in which there is a water reserve, where flora and fauna accumulate, often abundant.

Also, inflorescense emerges from the centre of the rosette, typical for its coloured bracts, from which usually white or blue flowers sprout, attached in rounded inflorescences which develop in the centre of the cup.

Aechmea triangularis survives to -6 C (21 F) and blooms

Canarius | Monday February 14th, 2011 |

Aechmea triangularis grows very well in mediterranean climate and warm temperate climates. It is an attractive bromeliad with golden-green leaves and brow-black spines. It produces a long lasting inflorescence in late spring, with red bracts and blue flowers. Before blooming, tips of leaves fold back forming a triangle, enhanced by dark red markings. Grow it in bright sun conditions, with little or no fertilizer, to achieve more compact and colurful plants.

Charlie Dill’s picture of Aechmea triangularis, blooming after a freeze

Aechmea triangularis can take low temperatures with little or no damage at -6 C (18 F) for several hours. About its cold tolerance, there is an interesting report written by Charlie Dill about different bromeliads surviving to -6 C (21 F) in California has texts and pictures of this species.

LINK TO CHARLIE DILL’S FROST DAMAGE REPORT OF AECHMEA TRIANGULARIS AND OTHER BROMELIADS

Charlie Dill’s picture of an unscathed Aechmea triangularis

Our Shop

Please visit the Bromeliad Section of our Shop and check back often, because we offerent different bromeliads at different times of the year. We ship bromeliads to anywhere in Europe. Our bromeliads are already growing in many European countries, such as Spain, Ireland, Italy, Poland, and Germany. All bromeliads in catalogue are sold as bare-rooted “pups”, which are the robust basal suckers produced after blooming. Our pups are very easy to root – some will already show some roots when you open the box.

Aechmea triangularis with dark leaf tips before blooming

Aechmea triangularis with dark leaf tips before blooming

New Species in the Shop – December 2010. Palms and Bromeliads

Canarius | Monday December 6th, 2010 |

Canarius has just been updated, with new additions of 15 PALMS and 7 BROMELIADS.

Let’s start with…

PALMS

New frost hardy species such as Brahea sarukhanii and Brahea sp. Nuri

We have spectacular plants of Allagoptera caudescens with leaves that are white underneath.

New species of Parajubaea: Parajubaea sunkha and Parajubaea cocoides. Now you can buy all the existing species of Parajubaea in Canarius.com

New larger sizes of previously offered palms, such as Kentiopsis, Rhopalostylis and Nannorhops, now in larger 20 cm pots.

New, Nannorrhops palms in 20 cm pots with large sized leaves

New, Nannorrhops palms in 20 cm pots with large sized leaves

New rare species of Pritchardia: P.minor and P.munroi. Pritchardia minor is a sought-after high-elevation species which stands more frost than others and keeps a small size.

Young Pritchardia minor in the Palmetum of Santa Cruz

Young Pritchardia minor in the Palmetum of Santa Cruz

We ship young potted plants like these:

Young pritchardia palm in 12 cm pot, ready for shipping.

Young pritchardia palm in 12 cm pot, ready for shipping.

and then…

BROMELIADS

The bromeliad nursery is growing larger. Each year we have more species to offer. This time we added new tough-leaved neoregelias, like Neoregelia concentrica Neoregelia farinosa.

Neoregelias are cold-sensitive bromeliads but N. concentrica is one of the most sought-after, cold-hardy neoregelias and can take some frost and snow.

Purple colours on Neoregelia concentrica

Purple colours on Neoregelia concentrica

Also Neoregelia camorimiana is back, and N. burlemarxii.

Neoregelia camorimiana becomes very red and shiny

Neoregelia camorimiana becomes very red and shiny

There is also a new Billbergia distachya var. rubra, a great wild type with bright, wide bracts.

We ship large-sized pups of bromeliads like these:

Pups of Neoregelia burlemarxii, ready for shipping. They can bloom in one year.

Pups of Neoregelia burlemarxii, ready for shipping. They can bloom in one year.

Parajubaea sunkha
Parajubaea cocoides

Hardy Bromeliads for Outdoor Conditions

Canarius | Tuesday October 19th, 2010 |

Bromeliads, or Bromeliaceae, are highly appreciated plants because of their incredible colours and inflorescences, and their ease of growth in pots.

  • Garden Centers througout the world sell floppy-leaved hybrids with green leaves.
  • Canarius on the internet offers tough-leaved species with colourful leaves, grown in the Canary Islands.

Neoregelia chlorosticta blooming with yellow and red leaves

Floppy leaved, green bromeliads

  • Taxonomy: These plants often belong to the genera Guzmania and Vriesea
  • Conditions: They come from humid forest environments. They grow well in low light, sheltered conditions. They are sensitive to wind, drought, sunlight and temperature shocks. They are good for the terrarium.
  • Where: in the greenhouse, terrarium, sheltered patio.

Tough-leaved, colourful bromeliads

  • Taxonomy: Most of them belong to the genera Aechmea, Billbergia and Neoregelia.
  • Conditions: They grow well in non-tropical climates. They like temperature changes and can better stand outdoors conditions in general. They seldom burn in the hottest sun, they stand wind very well. Many of the tough-leaved Bromeliaceae are resistant to occasional frosts, without any damage. They will always tolerate drought for days or even weeks. Most of our species will thrive outdoors in mediterranean climates, with minimal protection.
  • Where: In the garden, sunny patio, balcony or terrace, being Subtropical and Mediterranean to Warm Temperate. They can be kept in your home during the colder months.

Aechmea lueddemanniana is a stiff-leaved bromeliaceae with long lasting flowes and fruits.

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Our Shop

Please visit the Bromeliad Section of our Shop and check back often, because we offerent different bromeliads at different times of the year. We ship bromeliads to anywhere in Europe. Our bromeliads are already growing in many European countries, such as Spain, Ireland, Italy, Poland, and Germany. All bromeliads in catalogue are sold as bare-rooted “pups”, which are the robust basal suckers produced after blooming. Our pups are very easy to root – some will already show some roots when you open the box.

Aechmea triangularis with dark leaf tips before blooming

All bromeliads in catalogue are sold as bare-rooted “pups”, which are the robust basal suckers produced after blooming. Our pups are very easy to root – some will already show some roots when you open the box.