Tag Archives: Succulent Plants

Succulent plants grown in the Canary Islands

succulent-plants-in-the-canary-islands Team Canarius | Monday November 7th, 2016 |

The so-called succulent plants include thousands of species located in arid zones around the planet. The Canary Islands are a clear example of the ideal place for these succulent species to grow, thanks to their unique climatic conditions: warm, arid, and windy environment.

The succulent plants or “fat plants” are water retention species, which are adapted to drought conditions. These plants store succum (juice, water) in their leaves, stems, or roots, and often show a thick and fleshy appearance.

The Weather in the Canary Islands

euphorbia-milii-cv-mini

EUPHORBIA MILII CV. MINI

In the Canarian archipelago, there is a Mediterranean-subtropical climate. This means that during the coldest months of the year, the species take a “winter break”. Also, the sun and wind prevailing in the Islands help to keep under control and naturally the fungus or other diseases that could affect these plants.

Typically, the oceanic volcanic islands, arising from the bottom of the sea, are home to unique floras and faunas as a consequence of their development in small enclosures and areas isolated from direct contact with the continent.

In this sense, and at least as far as plants are concerned, in the Canary Islands, there are abundant cases of so-called adaptive radiation or insular differentiation, with flourishing endemic species.

The vegetal landscape of the low zone of the Canary Islands is characterised by the abundant presence of succulent and semi-succulent plants, dominating within them the species of the genus Euphorbia, that come to give a name to the main communities of vegetables. Plants of this type of vegetation have developed strategies to support the arid and semi-desert climate of these areas.

The origin of most of the species that we can find here is North African and to a lesser extent Mediterranean, among the most common succulent plants belonging to the Euphorbiaceae (Euphorbia), Asclepiadoideae (Ceropegia, Caralluma), Crassulaceae (Aeonium, Monanthes), and Asteraceae (Kleinia) families.

Succulent plants in the Canary Islands are grown mainly outdoors and in full sun. Most of these plants are exported to continental Europe; others end up in the most famous natural parks of the Islands.

In our online store of succulent plants, you can find the most outstanding species of this family. Canarius offers a selection of succulent plants endorsed by the highest quality since they have been grown outdoors and under the full sun of the Canary Islands.

A Baobab Tree Growing in Europe

Canarius | Tuesday June 17th, 2014 |

In the heart of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain there is a beautiful African Baobab Tree (Adansonia digitata), planted in the year 2000, when it was a few years old and 3-4 m tall. It is not exactly “Europe” but yes… this is still Europe!

This tree was purchased in Senegal, by the City Council. It is now adult and it is becoming quite large. It is flowering and fruiting since 2012. It is located in the commercial downtown, by the intersection between Calle del Pilar and Calle Suárez Guerra, close to the popular square named Plaza del Príncipe.

This is the only large baobab in the city, except the ones the botanical garden Palmetum de Santa Cruz, which are also adults but just a bit younger.

It sheds leaves for three or four months, chiefly between February and April. Its large white flowers are developed between July and September. In summer 2013 they were featured in a local newspaper, because they are truly attractive and people do notice them. This picture of the flower is from the article linked here.

Picture featured in the newspaper (see link above)

The latin name of the baobab is Adansonia digitata. It is a beautiful symbolic tree, able to attain a gigantic size. It is easy to cultivate in pots, as long as it is kept above 8 C and kept dry in winter, when leafless. Leaves are dark green, glossy and palmate. Flowers are an absolute beauty. The fruit is edible.

These are our pictures taken in May 2014, when it is growing the new leaves.

Adansonia digitata (2)Adansonia digitata (1)  Adansonia digitata (3)

Canarius is your web-based plant shop, with lots of unusual species available.  We ship worldwide, directly to your home. Visit THIS LINK and see pictures of our plants on the packing desk and learn more about what we ship.

Furcraea gigantea variegata in the nursery

Canarius | Wednesday December 22nd, 2010 |

Furcraea gigantea variegata is a spectacular ornamental plant for Mediterranean to Tropical climates.

When a specimen blooms, it produced a huge, tall structure with abundant flowers. Some months later, hundreds of aerial pups are produced on the inflorescence and they are collected for reproduction. A few, non-variegated (non-striped) plants are discarded and only the variegated plants are kept. Here you can see some small pups rooting in the nursery.  This picture was taken in Spring 2010.  Nine months later, these plants are ready for the market and average 40-50 cm in height.

These plants are NOW AVAILABLE ! – You can buy them in the Agave Section of our shop.

Furcraea gigantea variegata in the nursery

Furcraea gigantea variegata in the nursery

A new variegated Agave attenuata from Tenerife

Canarius | Wednesday December 1st, 2010 |

We grow a new variegated form of Agave attenuata with striped leaves. It is unique because it appeared in the Canary Islands from a normal plant. In 2004, the local plant grower Luís Borja obtained the original variegated branch from a plant grown in Tegueste, Northern Tenerife. Agave attenuata Tenerife is only reproduced by pups, so it takes a lot of time to make many plants.

We reproduced the plant on a small scale and it was released in 2010 with the name Tenerife.

Agave attenuata Tenerife is a very stable variegated clone of Agave attenuata. Stripes are yellow, often close to the margins but sometimes scattered anywhere in the blade. Leaves are particularly waxy.

Variegated Agave attenuata Tenerife

Variegated Agave attenuata Tenerife

Agave attenuata Tenerife is a good grower if compared to other variegated types of  Agave attenuata, because it is quite fast growing and it will seldom or never burn in full sun.

Agave attenuata variegata Tenerife

Agave attenuata variegata Tenerife

You can buy rooted pups of this succulent plant in the Agave Shop, at Canarius.com.

The following pictures show normal, non-varigated pictures of Agave attenuata, which is a widespread ornamental plant in the Canary Islands,

Normal Agave attenuata in Tenerife

Normal Agave attenuata in Tenerife

 

Agave attenuata Clump

Clump of a typical, non-variegated Agave attenuata

Subtropical Climate

Canarius | Tuesday May 11th, 2010 |

Subtropical climates are non tropical climates with cool winters with little or no frosts. In subtropical climates, Winter is a noticeably cooler season. It is relatively warm, but never as hot as the summer season. These climates rarely, if ever, see frost or snow. Subtropical belts exist in both hemispheres and they are located just North and South of the tropics.

Rainfall patterns vary widely throughout the subtropics including hot deserts, savannas, monsoon forests, humid forests and the warmer parts of the Mediterranean climate zone. Subtropical regions include:

Typical House in Tenerife, with a Subtropical Kentia Palm and Potted Cacti

Northern Hemisphere: California, Texas, Florida, Canary Islands and Madeira, parts of the Mediterranean, northern India, southeast China, Southern Japan

Southern Hemisphere:  So. Brazil, N. Argentina, Parts of Chile, Uruguay, large parts of Australia and coastal South Africa (Mostly Natal)

Subtropical Climate in Europe

Europe has some Subtropical spots too in warmer, coastal areas within the mediterranean climate area. The climate in the Southern Mediterranean, with little or no frost , can be defined as Subtropical climate. This is the case of the coastal areas of Southern Portugal (Algarve), Southern Spain (Andalucia, Almeria, Murcia), Southern Italy (Sicilia, Calabria) and Southern Greece. Even cooler Subtropical areas can be found in Southern France (Cote d’Azur). Warmer spots are also found in the United Kingdom, precisely in the Isles of Scilly with 6 °C (42.8 °F) average in the coldest month. Of course there is a lot of difference between the Isles of Scilly and a typically hot subtropical climate like Florida. The English islands have a cooler, even climate reminiscent of the mountain climate in the warmer Subtropics.

The Canary Islands are located in the Subtropical belt too, very close to the tropics. The climate is frost-free on the coast, but it less hot than in many Subtropical areas because of the trade winds and the cold ocean. The Canaries are the only territory of Europe located straight into the subtropical belt.  Even here we do not have a typical subtropical climate, because our climate is also Mediterranean, because of the rainfall pattern and also Oceanic, because of the cooling effect of the sea.

Fruiting papaya in the Canary Islands

Exotic Gardens and Crops in Subtropical Climates

Many tropical species will tolerate the winter in the Subtropics and will grow outdoors. More than 500 palm species can live in Subtropical areas with little or no frost, exotic flowers such as Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia) or (Heliconia) and many Cycad species. The beautiful Bromeliad Family is a must in any garden. Hundreds of species of Succulent Plants from dry areas can grow and bloom as long as they are kept dry in winter. The dry subtropics include many of the world desert, so here is where most desert gardens are developed. Also the tropical succulent species will do fine, like Melocactus or Adenium and Pachypodium if kept well drained. Palm-like desert plants, such as Yucca and Dasylirion, thrive to perfection.

Melocactus conoideus grows outdoors on the Subtropical coast of Tenerife

Fully tropical species can grow in the Subtropics. They may slow down or stop in winter but most will grow reasonably well. Many tropical fruit trees grow freely. Mango, Papaya, Sugar Cane and Avocados are produced commercially in various subtropical regions of the world. Occasional frosts or short summers limit the spread of tropical horticulture in the Subtropics.

A blue leaved Cycad from the subtropical coast of South Africa, Encephalartos arenarius.

An impressive number of Palms and Cycads is kept by collectors. Many tropical flowers will winter outdoors. Bromeliads can be used freely as garden plants, as well as Heliconias. In lower latitudes, Cacti and Succulents are simply part of the landscape. Different species of Agave, mostly from Mexico, grow wild on the hillsides of Mediterranean Europe and Aloes flourish in pots and gardens. Large specimens will often enhance the garden of the villa, in the ground or in large pots. Southern Spain and Portugal are even sunnier, almost as Northern Africa so Cuban Royal Palms (Roystonea regia) and Royal Poincianas (Delonix regia) thrive in many coastal location, papayas will fruit with little effort.

With some protection and some effort you can grow subtropical plants in colder climates. Visit our blog section about Tropical Gardening in Northern Climates.

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Come to our shop and buy the best subtropical plants of all kinds. We ship to anywhere in Europe.

Neoregelia chlorosticta blooming with yellow and red leaves

Fabulous colours on the bromeliad Neoregelia chlorosticta, blooming with yellow and red leaves